ASIA 101: INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN STUDIES
This course introduces the traditions and modern development of Asia with special attention to theoretical and methodological issues. The approach is interdisciplinary, covering subject areas such as history, culture, art, literature, music, religion, economics, politics, and law. The course offers an introduction to the region and provides an important foundation for students interested in taking more specialized courses. [GM1 and GM2] LI YANG MW 11:00-12:15pm

A & S 243–ASIAN AMERICA
In this course, we will explore the diversity of Asian/Pacific groups in the Americas, their trajectories of migration, racialization, and community formation. In addition to focusing on people’s everyday lived experiences, we will also discuss multiple approaches to “Asian America” as a topic of scholarship and activism. We will be paying close attention to the ways that Asian American identities are not only about race and ethnicity, but also gender, generation, sexuality, and class. Prerequisite: A&S 102 NEHA VORA TTh 1:15-2:30pm.

ART 140: ART AND ARCHITECTURE OF WORLD TRADITIONS: ASIA, AFRICA, AND THE AMERICAS
This course is designed to introduce students to works of art in various media developed in isolation from the European tradition. Lectures will focus on the major artistic traditions of South and Southeast Asia, the Islamic World, China, Japan, Oceania, the Americas, and Africa. Using visual arts as a tool, this course will introduce students to the diverse social customs, religions, and beliefs of peoples from these regions. [GM1, GM2, H] Furniss MWF 10:00-10:50am

ART 240:  JAPANESE ART AND ARCHITECTURE
This course is an introductory survey to the artistic and architectural tradition of Japan from Neolithic times to the present. The course will focus on the cultural, social, and political movements that informed Japanese artistic and architectural changes over time, as well as the profound impact that the mainland (China, Korea, and indirectly, India) had on its religious, social, cultural, and artistic development. [GM2, H] Furniss MWF 2:10-3:00pm

CHINESE 101: ELEMENTARY CHINESE
There is no prerequisite requirement for this course. Fundamentals of spoken and written language of the world’s most populous country! Mastery of Pinyin system with tones is stressed. Familiarity with Pinyin-based character input method is developed. Chinese cultural topics are also introduced. LI YANG MWF 9:00-9:50am

CHINESE 111: INTERMEDIATE CHINESE
Prerequisites:  CHN 102 or equivalent.  Training skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing Mandarin Chinese at a higher level.  More complex grammar items are introduced.  Review and expansion of vocabulary. Attention to developing more elaborate communicative skills and a deeper understanding of Chinese culture.
[H, EPSL] LI YANG MWF 10:00-10:50am

CHINESE 211: ADVANCED CHINESE
This course is a continuation of 112, or taken with the instructor’s permission. Review of important grammar items. Expansion of vocabulary.  More advanced reading and speaking skills are emphasized. [H, EPSL, GM2] HAN LUO TTH 11:00am-12:15pm

CHINESE 290: INDEPENDENT STUDY
This course may be taken as a continuation after CHN 211, or with the instructor’s permission.  Sampling of authentic language materials is emphasized. A continued development of advanced communicative skills and cultural knowledge.  Staff TBA

CHINESE 311: CONTEMPORARY CHINA I
Through a diversity of authentic materials in various media such as newspapers and periodicals, this course greatly expands students’ Mandarin proficiency in all four skills while deepening their understanding of the social and cultural issues facing China today. Students’ language skills will be enhanced through intensive reading, discussion, presentation, debate, and essay writing. Prerequisites: Six semesters of Chinese or equivalent. HAN LUO TTH  9:30-10:45am

GOVT 270: CHINESE FOREIGN POLICY
This course examines the sources and conduct of Chinese foreign policy from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. The first part of the course explores major factors that influence China’s foreign relations, including historical legacies, the international system, domestic politics, and nationalism. The second half of the course turns to the practice of Chinese foreign policy over a wide-range of issue areas, such as China’s relations with the United States, trade, regionalism, nuclear proliferation, energy and climate change. Prerequisites: ASIA 101, GOVT 102, or GOVT 103 (or permission of the instructor). [SS] IL HYUN CHO MW 2:45-4:00pm

GOVT 415: NATIONALISM IN WORLD POLITICS
This course explores the concept and practice of nationalism, with a particular emphasis on the role that it plays in world politics. We will survey the main concepts and theories in the study of nationalism, identify the major actors and processes in the politics of nationalism, examine the emergence of nationalism as a major force in international relations, and investigate various links between questions of national identity and interstate cooperation or conflict. Prerequisite: Govt 102 plus one from Govt 221-238 (or permission of the instructor).
[SS, GM2, WRIT] SEO-HYUN PARK TTh 2:45-4:00pm

HISTORY 121: INTRODUCTION TO HISTORY: PARTITION OF THE INDIAN SUBCONTINENT
One of the most violent and disruptive events of the 20th century, the Partition of the Indian subcontinent into the nation-states of India and Pakistan in 1947 continues to play a staggering role in the post-colonial histories of both countries. This course will go into the high politics of the Partition, its human costs, and its continued impact on everyday life through oral history. The course will also examine the impact of Partition in literature and cinema. [SS, WRIT] HAFSA KANJWAL MW 11:00am-12:15pm

 HISTORY 248:  EAST ASIA’S LAST DYNASTIES: JAPAN, KOREA AND CHINA, 1600-1900
A comparative study of institution-building, economic life, and social history in China, Korea and Japan from 1600 to 1900. Themes include: impact of economic growth and urbanization on agrarian societies; the transition from empire to nation-state; and the interactions of China, Japan, Korea and the Western powers on the eve of dynastic collapse. [SS, GM2] PAUL BARCLAY TTh 11:00am-12:15pm

 JAPANESE 101: ELEMENTARY JAPANESE
There is no prerequisite requirement for this course. This course teaches fundamentals of spoken and written language, including real-life situation contexts of greetings, counting, explaining daily activities, requesting, making plans, and shopping. NAOKO IKEGAMI MWF 9:00-9:50am

JAPANESE 111: INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE
Japanese 101 and 102 are the prerequisites for this course or with the instructor’s permission. This course reviews and expands the basic structure patterns and vocabulary with increasing emphasis on reading. More elaborate social and ritual exchanges as well as casual speech are developed.
[H, EPSL] NAOKO IKEGAMI 10:00-10:50am

 JAPANESE 290: INDEPENDENT STUDY
This course may be taken as a continuation after 112, or with the instructor’s permission. This course is emphasizes on reading more authentic materials and on writing compositions and corresponding.NAOKO IKEGAMI TBA

MUSIC 103: INTRODUCTION TO WORLD MUSIC TRADITIONS
This course offers an exploration of indigenous musics of Africa, India, Indonesia, and Japan through performance and analysis of major genres. Approximately 2/3 of the course content deals with regions of Asia. [H, GM2] LARRY STOCKTON TTh 11:00am-12:15pm

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 204: INDIA’S RELIGIOUS TEXTS
This course introduces the oral and written traditions of South Asian religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Islam with selections from a range of texts. Among the sources considered will be those focusing on myths, rituals, sacred biography, and devotional poetry, among others. The course examines the use of oral and written traditions in religious practice drawn from diverse sources, both ancient and modern. [GM1, H,V] HERMAN TULL W 7:00-9:50pm

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 215: ISLAM                                                
This course is an introduction to Islam, a religion that flowered into a world civilization.  It covers the vast and dynamic range of Muslim religious life from the time of Muhammad to the present. The broad survey spans the foundational texts of the Quran and prophetic traditions as well as later Islamic thought, including jurisprudence, theology, and mysticism.  The course highlights modern debates within and about Islam. Topics include political Islam, religious pluralism, the limits of jihad, and the possibilities of Islamic feminism. [H, V] Patel  TTh  11:00am-12:15pm

Key to Abbreviations for Common Course of Studies:

H=Humanities; SS=Social Sciences; GM2=Global Multicultural 2; EPSL=Elementary Proficiency in a Second Language; V=Values; W=Writing